Supply Chain Decisions and Data Analytics


Data analytics is a growing market that takes advantage of the seemingly endless data that is available to us. This course will cover hypothesis testing, linear regression and factor analysis, along with the computer programs needed to analyze the data. Students will gain an understanding and appreciation of data analytics, so that they can apply it to make sound decisions in the business world.

Prerequisites:


No prerequisites


Effective Procurement Strategies


This course will discuss the various ways to procure goods and services, and when each method is most appropriate. When does it make sense to buy equipment based on lowest bid? When should one use best value procurement and consider factors other than cost? The importance of good product specifications and work scopes will be covered, along with strategies for evaluating one product against another. Many organizations employ leading technology to aid them in procurement, such as e-procurement and shopping basket technology that saves both time and money.

Prerequisites:


No prerequisites


Logistics and Transportation Management


Logistics management is the art of getting materials from here to there. It includes transporting products through modes such as truck, rail, and air. This course will discuss the history of teach mode, including the oldest form of transportation, water. Government oversight and regulation of transportation will be covered, as well as the deregulation of transportation that occurred in the 1980s. What are the best methods of transport for local shipments? What about transport to other parts of the world?

Prerequisites:


No prerequisites


Technology Impacts in the Supply Chain


Supply chain leaders throughout the world agree that technology is advancing more rapidly than ever. This course discusses the technology cycle and how it has impacted the supply chain in recent decades. This includes the use of ERPs for inventory management, procurement, and customer relationship management. In the future, technology will continue to increase efficiency through the use of tools like RFID, warehouse robotics, and even drone delivery. Knowledge of available technology is imperative for supply chain managers.

Prerequisites:


No prerequisites


Sustainable Supply Chain Strategies


It can be said that every purchase has hidden social, environmental, and financial impact. What products are today’s companies buying and how do they impact future generations? This class will discuss strategies that leading organizations throughout the world employ in their day-to-day procurement decisions. These include the use of products that minimize harm to the environment and human health, as well as purchasing decisions that support local communities and small businesses.

Prerequisites:


Offering code Offering title
SCMT.X400 Evolving Role of Supply Chain Management

Managing Global Supply Chains


The products that consumers use every day do not reach their local stores by accident. They are produced, assembled, and shipped from all over the world. Knowing how a product reaches its final destination is an important part of supply chain management. This class will cover trends in global supply chains, such as ocean transportation and overseas manufacturing (off-shoring). How can we make the best sourcing decisions and how do we ensure supplier performance when they are in another country and time zone?

Prerequisites:


Offering code Offering title
SCMT.X400 Evolving Role of Supply Chain Management

Supply Chain Operations Management


This course covers operations from a supply chain perspective from understanding the importance of processes and process thinking to managing the flow of products, services and information. You will learn how the various partners and functional groups are becoming more integrated and how they interact with each other. Students will be able to define and describe the different planning activities required to manage operations across the supply chain from the supplier to the customer.

Prerequisites:


Offering code Offering title
SCMT.X400 Evolving Role of Supply Chain Management

Supply Chain Management Certificate Completion Review


Once all of the certificate requirements have been met and your final grades are posted, please access your Student Portal to enroll in the “Certificate Completion Review” to begin the review process. Please allow up to 4 weeks to receive your certificate.

Prerequisites:


No prerequisites


Supply Chain Management

Group

About

“Supply chain management (SCM) is the active streamlining of a business' supply-side activities to maximize customer value and gain a competitive advantage in the marketplace. SCM represents an effort by suppliers to develop and implement supply chains that are as efficient and economical as possible. Supply chains cover everything from production, to product development, to the information systems needed to direct these undertakings.” 

—Investopedia.com

There is no better time to study the critical role supply chain management plays in an organization’s bottom line. Historically supply chain and purchasing was a very reactive profession, fulfilling the orders that came down from various departments. But, today’s supply chain professional is radically different. The SCM professional works collaboratively with individuals in the organization to fulfill their needs in a proactive way. He or she looks outside the company to ensure the whole system—logistics, supply and procurement are efficient, cost effective and sustainable. With the right skills the supply chain manager gains a practical understanding of continuous process improvement through effective use of logistics planning and navigates the path of profitability.

RESOURCES

•    U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook

•    Glassdoor: Supply Chain Manager Salaries

•    Institute for Supply Management® (ISM®), a not-for-profit professional supply management organization worldwide. 

•    APICS, professional supply management organization worldwide. 

•    RSI Logistics

•    CareerOneStop, a project of of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration
 

The Profession

“The need for top-notch supply chain management is escalating around the world. As a result, professionals with the leadership skills to create and manage high-performing supply chains are more elusive and difficult to find, yet are critical for organizations to succeed.” 

—From “The Rise of Supply Chain,” APICS Annual Report 2016

Supply chain management (SCM) is all about providing an organization the resources it needs to accomplish its mission and objectives—finished goods, raw materials, equipment, services, and everything in between. Every business sector, public and private, has a need for SCM professionals who understand best SCM practices to drive savings and profitability. Among the many SCM roles are buyers, material planners, logistics managers, data analysts, and procurement directors.

During the last two years in North America, the industry has experienced record orders for robotics and automated supply chain equipment as well as an explosion in the SCM software market. The industry will not be looking for people to stack pallets, retrieve products from the top shelf, or other manual jobs. SCM professionals will be operating in higher level leadership positions and will working with an evolving digital supply chain that is making logistics faster than ever. Gartner industry analysts estimate the SCM software revenue will exceed $19 billion by 2021.

SALARY

•    $104,861 —a national average supply chain manager salary (Glassdoor, as of Nov. 4, 2017)
•    $74,170—logisticians 2016 median annual pay (Bureau of Labor Statistics)
•    $95,000—supply chain undergrad starting salary (2016, Michigan State University) 

JOB FORECAST

There is a 6:1 ratio of global demand vs. supply chain professionals, according to Nick Little, managing director of the Railway Management Program at the Eli Broad College of Business at Michigan State University.  In 2016, the supply chain management professional estimated a 30 percent annual growth rate of supply chain jobs requiring trained and educated people. 

The U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics is somewhat more conservative, forecasting that jobs within supply chain and logistics management will grow by more than 20 percent between now and 2022. 

New job opportunities are very likely in the future, given the large number of job openings projected for this profession by CareerOneStop, a project of of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.

Outcomes

SKILLS FOR SUCCESS

The UC-level, accredited SCM Certificate program curriculum reflects the top skills professionals need to be successful, including:
•  Advantages of supply and logistics planning;
•  Complexities of international shipping terms, including transportation law and deregulation;
•  SCM quality management tools;
•  Effective procurement strategy and leading trends; 
•  Data analytics in the supply chain process;
•  Sustainable supply chain strategies;
•  Emerging SCM software and new technology

In a recent report, “Millennials in Supply Chain,” (October 2017) by APICS, a national SCM professional organization, 81 percent of millennials surveyed said they felt they could make a difference in the SCM field and 88 percent said there saw opportunities for advancement in the field. Also, 65 percent of respondents said they intend to take continuing education programs or classes in the next 12 months to advance their careers and 45 percent believed earning professional certifications is critical to advancing in the field. 

 “Not only has supply chain emerged as a key differentiator and competitive advantage for businesses large and small, but it also brings enriching and meaningful opportunities to address a set of diverse, global, ecological and ethical challenges that have a very real and tangible impact on the world and its inhabitants – issues that millennials find worthwhile and personally rewarding,” according to the APQC, Supply Chain Management Review (Oct. 15, 2017).

Curriculum

Program Format

UCSC Extension’s Supply Chain Management program is offered at UC Santa Cruz Silicon Valley Campus, a beautiful facility located on the corner of Scott and Bowers in Santa Clara. Choose courses according to your interest or declare candidacy in the certificate for a more comprehensive overview of the field.

Certificate Requirements

Total: 8 courses

Required: 6 courses, 13.5 units

Evolving Role of Supply Chain Manager, 1.5 units
Effective Procurement Strategies, 3 units
Logistics and Transportation Management, 3 units
Supply Chain Operations Management, 3 units
Sustainable Supply Chain Strategies, 1.5 units
Technology Impacts in the Supply Chain, 1.5 units

Elective: 2 courses, 2.5 units

Business and Professional Writing, 2 units
Business Law and its Environment, 3 units
Effective Negotiations: Principles, Strategies, and Techniques, 1.5 units
Managing Global Supply Chains, 1.5 units
Project Procurement: Outsourcing and Contract Management, 1.5 units
Role of the Project Manager, 1.5 units
Supply Chain Decisions and Data Analytics, 2 units

GPA: 3.0, with a C or better in all courses.

Timeline: To earn the certificate, you must complete all minimum requirements within 3 years of declaring candidacy.

Transferring courses from other institutions: Courses completed more than 5 years prior to the date of certificate issuance cannot be used to fulfill requirements. Learn more about transferring credit here.

Required Courses

There are 6 required courses:

Electives

You must complete a minimum of 2 electives to earn the certificate.

Recommended Course Sequence

Evolving Role of Supply Chain Manager is the first required course.

PRICE

The rough cost of the Supply Chain Management certificate is $6,000.

Enroll

Enrollment

No application is required to enroll in our courses or certificate programs. Information about our open enrollment process can be found on our Enrollment page. If you have any questions about our programs, please contact the UCSC Extension Outreach office by phone at 408-861-3860, or by email at extensionprogram@ucsc.edu.

 

From the schedule below, click on a course title to see sections available for enrollment. You may view the full course schedule, or enroll in the course, by clicking the respective button. The course type offerings (classroom, online, blended) are guidelines and subject to change. A blended (hybrid) course has both classroom and online components.

 

Declaring Candidacy

If you intend to pursue a certificate, declaring candidacy establishes program requirements early in your studies, so any subsequent curriculum changes do not affect your progress. It does not limit what courses you can take; and it helps you structure your professional development program for maximum benefit to you. Go the declare candidacy page to establish your requirements for this program. Certificate program requirements must be completed within three years of declaring candidacy.

Course Schedule


1. Required Courses (minimum 13.5 units)
classroom : Classroom
online : Online
hybrid : Blended
Classroom and Blended : Classroom and Blended
Classroom and Online : Classroom and Online
Online and Blended : Online and Blended
2. Elective Courses (minimum 2.5 units)
classroom : Classroom
online : Online
hybrid : Blended
Classroom and Blended : Classroom and Blended
Classroom and Online : Classroom and Online
Online and Blended : Online and Blended
3. Special Offering
3. Required Certificate Review
classroom : Classroom
online : Online
hybrid : Blended
Classroom and Blended : Classroom and Blended
Classroom and Online : Classroom and Online
Online and Blended : Online and Blended
Offering Code Offering Units Fall Winter Spring Summer
O-CE0506 Supply Chain Management Certificate Completion Review

Evolving Role of Supply Chain Management


Supply chain management professionals who understand the latest best practices in this evolving field are in high demand. Students in this course take a look back to when purchasing was simply about buying requested materials and goods. They study the industry's evolution to include other areas of high impact such as, transportation, warehousing, and supplier management. Today's professionals have a much broader impact on an organization, particularly its bottom line, when they learn how to manage product planning, supplier development, and system implementation.

Prerequisites:


No prerequisites


Sections :


Section Start Date Time Location Cost Instructor Name Full Schedule Enroll
SCMT.X400.(1) 2/6/2018 06:00 PM SANTA CLARA 650 Darin Matthews View Enroll

Pages